Jul 17, 2001

The White Stripes

The Troubadour, Los Angeles, CA

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07/17/01 The Troubadour, Los Angeles, CA

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Set One

Let’s Shake Hands 106

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When I Hear My Name 110

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The Big Three Killed My Baby 155

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Jolene 221

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Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground 193

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Hotel Yorba 120

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I Think I Smell a Rat 122

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Little Room 55

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The Union Forever 251

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We're Going To Be Friends 135

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Expecting 114

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Aluminum 43

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Baby Blue 174

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Cool Drink of Water Blues 79

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Astro 110

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Farmer John 49

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Your Southern Can Is Mine 94

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Broken Bricks 189

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Screwdriver 199

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You're Pretty Good Looking 98

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Boll Weevil 174

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Encore

Hello Operator 127

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St. James Infirmary Blues 101

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Look Me Over Closely 227

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Show Notes

24 bit files are at 192 khz

Enjoy this show recap from Third Man Record's Own, Ben Blackwell:

It'd be delusional for anyone to argue that the White Stripes gig at the Troubadour in Los Angeles on July 17th of 2001 was the primary focus for the band that day. Of far more intrigue and excitement was their mid-afternoon recording of a live performance at CBS Studios for the evening broadcast of The Late Show With Craig Kilborn. 

So once THAT had commenced and the Troubadour confirmed that they could pull up CBS on the television behind the bar...the rest of the day is just a bonus.

Listening back twenty years later, I have to say that the show feels unmoored without a slide blues interlude of "Death Letter" anchoring it all. I know the band didn't play "Death Letter" at EVERY show, but damn, at this point in the career, it seems like it was all but a given. 

So what a delight it is for off-the-cuff covers like Tommy Johnson's "Cool Drink of Water Blues" and Gene Vincent's "Baby Blue" and "Farmer John" by Don and Dewey all to sit comfortably among the standards of the era like "Dead Leaves" and "Little Room" and "The Union Forever." The accent-based "St. James Infirmary" is always a treat and anytime any song comes after "Boll Weevil" I consider that extra special.

The celebratory feeling of seeing Jack and Meg bash out "Screwdriver" and "Your Southern Can Is Mine" on Kilborn on the modest screen behind the storied downstairs bar was probably the last moment where I most truly thought "there's no getting bigger than this" for the White Stripes. And the fact that we're here, now, twenty years later still talking about and sharing these recollections is all the proof I need that the White Stripes are amazingly still relevant and, in many ways, still getting bigger.